Category Archives: Web Trends

UX for an Agile World (Part III)

by Stuart Ridgway, Original Music for Film and Television.  I originally wrote this article for Excella.com on October 5, 2016.

More and more, the development world is embracing Agile practices.  As we learned in Part I of this series, the UX team must find a balance between gaining a complete understanding of the customer with bringing high impact value to the product early and often. To do so, we need to know how to engage with the Agile team as described in Part II.

feedback-loop

Building Towards the MVP

Keep in mind that one of the most important steps in an Agile process is gathering feedback from users to ensure your developers are building the right product.  The UX team is instrumental in building and maintaining that feedback loop.  Let’s get to the meat of the problem:  how does the UX team plan out their daily activities to coincide and complement each Agile sprint?  Continue reading

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UX for an Agile World (Part I)

by Stuart Ridgway, Original Music for Film and Television.  I originally wrote this article for Excella.com on September 13, 2016.

agile-ux_blog

Integrate Good UX Practices into Agile Development

More and more organizations are recognizing User Experience (UX) as a cornerstone of the products and services they deliver. Beyond being a hot buzzword, there is real science, methodology, and process behind the UX services that Excella provides. UX is a key component for delivering real business and customer value with the software products we build. But more importantly, we have developed unique insights into using great UX design practices to make IT projects shine. Continue reading

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Don’t Let Bad UX Kill Your Open Data – Part 2

by Stuart Ridgway, Original Music for Film and Television.

You can see my presentation on this topic at the UXDC 2015 conference.

This is Part Two in a series that identifies opportunities for improving the experience when working with open data. In Part One we established that there are at least two primary opportunities. In this article we look at the first: improve the UX around documentation for APIs.  I am building an app called Kittinder! An App for Setting Up Play Dates for Your Cat and want to show you where the UX for open data documentation needs help. Continue reading

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Don’t Let Bad UX Kill Your Open Data – Part 1

You can see my presentation on this topic at the UXDC 2015 conference.

Not much has been written about the user experience (UX) of working with open data.  This is troublesome for those of use who work with open data everyday; we either provide a sub-optimal experience for our data customers or we suffer ourselves when pulling in data from less mature external sources.  Nevertheless, this is an opportunity for UX-ers who are looking for green fields where they can share their knowledge (and get paid).

This is part 1 in a series of articles that covers steps you can take, as a UX professional or a product owner for open data, to improve the UX that an organization provides its data customers. Continue reading

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Stuart Ridgway

I’m a big fan of Quora and answers a lot of questions there. Feel free to view my Quora profile to see what else I’ve been writing about.

SMEMChat: Using Social Media to Navigate Emergencies

by Stuart Ridgway, Original Music for Film and Television

I originally posted this article on the AWAREForum.org on February 3, 2012.

Who and What is SMEMChat

If you work in the Emergency Management field and have an interest in social media, you may have run across SMEMChat (Social Media and Emergency Management Chat) on Twitter.  Every Friday, from 12:30 to 1:30pm EST, Twitter users who are interested in emergency management follow tweets that contain the hashtag #smemchat.  AWARE readers will be interested in the lively conversations relating to the intersection of emergency management and social media.  Chats are open to anyone to contribute to or to just watch.

Over the last year I have learned a lot about emergency management and social media from a wide range of participants, such as public safety executives, social media strategists, emergency managers, and crisis communications experts.  I have also found that most of the participants adhere to several worthy and implicit tenets regarding the use of social media during an emergency: Continue reading

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Ushahidi: From Crisis to Community

by Stuart Ridgway, Original Music for Film and Television

I originally posted this article on the AWAREForum.org on June 29, 2011.

On June 17, 2011 the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) sponsored an event that brought together “crisis mappers” from the government, private sector, and from conflict zones around the world.  The two-hour discussion revolved around Ushahidi, a non-profit tech company that develops free and open source software for information collection, visualization, and interactive mapping.  In addition to the interest I have in new capabilities such as mapping crisis situations such as post-election violence, I also learned several lessons on how tools such as Ushahidi can be used to facilitate online discussions around emergencies. Continue reading

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Senate Hearing on Social Media in the Aftermath of Disasters

by Stuart Ridgway, Original Music for Film and Television

I originally posted this article on the AWAREForum.org on May 12, 2011.

On May 5, 2011, I attended the Understanding the Power of Social Media as a Communications Tool in the Aftermath of Disasters hearing at the U.S. Senate.  The hearing was divided into two parts:  the first was reserved for testimony by Craig Fugate, Administrator for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and the second was reserved for testimony by representatives from Google, the American Red Cross, and CrisisCommons. Continue reading

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Social Media in the Government – Part 2

by Stuart Ridgway, Original Music for Film and Television

This article is Part 2 of the Social Media in the Government series. This is a reprint of an article I published May 18, 2010. Social Media has a evolved a little bit since then so don’t be surprised if some of the material is a little out of date. 😉

~ Collaborative Tools ~

Wikis

Wikis are online encyclopedias that enable the easy creation, editing, and linking of web pages. Typically, wikis are created to enable multiple contributors to capture knowledge and share information about a specific subject. That knowledge is then searchable from the wiki’s search engine using a web browser. The most famous wiki is Wikipedia but wikis do not have to be public and can be confined to a select group if required. Continue reading

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Social Media in the Government – Part 1

by Stuart Ridgway, Original Music for Film and Television

This is a reprint of an article I published May 18, 2010. Social Media has a evolved a little bit since then so don’t be surprised if some of the material is a little out of date. 😉

Social media means different things to different people. A common thread running through many definitions of social media is “a blending of technology and socializing for the co-creation of value.” Social Media usually implies Internet interaction that enables a dialog among multiple contributors that fosters an atmosphere of collaboration. As a result, social media-based websites comprise an abundance of user generated content (UGC). This has its pros and cons as described below.

People around the world are becoming more accustomed to participating in social media spaces. It follows that they bring that expectation to government websites. A such, there has been continuing pressure on government agencies to further leverage social media tools. Continue reading

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