Monthly Archives: October 2012

Peer-to-Peer Alert Systems – Part III

by Stuart Ridgway, Original Music for Film and Television

This is the last of three articles exploring peer-to-peer communications and how these technologies could impact the timeliness and relevance of emergency alerting.  These first appeared in September, 2012 on the AWARE Forum.

Last week I wrote about the basics of peer-to-peer alerting for mobile devices and how peer networks might facilitate the dissemination of alerts. I also published Peer-to-Peer Alert Systems Part II that provided the several examples of mesh networks. In this article, I wrap up the discussion by presenting examples of star networks as well as combined mesh/star networks. Continue reading

Peer-to-Peer Alert Systems – Part II

by Stuart Ridgway, Original Music for Film and Television

This is the second of three articles exploring peer-to-peer communications and how these technologies could impact the timeliness and relevance of emergency alerting.  These first appeared in September, 2012 on the AWARE Forum.

Last week I wrote about the basics of peer-to-peer alerting for mobile devices and how peer networks might facilitate the dissemination of alerts. In this article I provide several examples of technologies that demonstrate the first of two types of peer networks called “mesh” networks.

To recap from Part I: in a mesh network all devices that have some kind of peer relationship, talk to each other, and co-exist as equal peers. As devices move out of the network and form new ones with new peers, information is continually shared. Continue reading

Peer-to-Peer Alert Systems – Part I

by Stuart Ridgway, Original Music for Film and Television

This is the first of three articles exploring peer-to-peer communications and how these technologies could impact the timeliness and relevance of emergency alerting.  These first appeared in September, 2012 on the AWARE Forum.

Mother Nature often provides terrific insight when looking for inspiration and innovation. The invention of VELCRO is a perfect example. When we search for improvements to alert dissemination, we need look no further than the 22,000 species of ants that traverse our planet.

The first lesson we can learn is that ants rely on more than one method for notifying each other of new sources of food or imminent threats. As we look more closely at our own systems it may help to examine alerting methods where ants are more successful than we are. The second lesson we can learn is that ants require no more infrastructure than what they already have on their bodies–a very efficient use of resources. Continue reading